NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ–In the summer of 2016, at the corner of George Street and Livingston, you could often find a crowd of people huddled at Monument Square Park playing Pokémon Go, the first popular augmented reality game.

This was a popular location, where players would throw “lures” to attract extra Pokémon and people would spend hours catching and collecting from the three Pokéstops on the same street corner.

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NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ—Detectives were spotted investigating another shooting that took place near Throop Avenue and Comstock Street in the city's Second Ward.

It was shortly before mignight on Sunday, August 5, and it looked like it might be the last major crime of the day.

It was a day that already had seen two men injured in an aggravated assault on the other side of the city.

But more crime was still to come before the clock struck midnight.

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NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ—It takes a certain type of person to use their own situation, one another might easily find debilatating, and use it to lift the spirits of children in need.

Josh Sundquist – who only has one leg – is that type of person, and he recently visited the Hub City this summer to help raise funds for the Children's Miracle Network (CMN).

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NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ—A powerful official with several public jobs, including a key role at the city's parking authority, became the second person in the city's history to be fined for violating New Jersey's Local Government Ethics Law (LGEL).

Leonard Bier, a longtime attorney for the New Brunswick Parking Authority (NBPA), will be required to pay just $200 as punishment for multiple ethical violations that were brought to light by this newspaper in March 2016.

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NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ—At two consecutive meetings of the New Brunswick Board of Education, Business Administrator and Board Secretary Rich Jannarone confirmed that despite, “aggressive” promotion efforts, enrollment for the city's preschool program is down.

New Brunswick offers universal preschool to residents, meaning city residents can send their children ages 3 or4 free of charge to one of the 20 providers that offer anywhere from one to twelve 15-student classrooms during the school year.

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