NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ—The summer of 1967 saw racial tensions flare into violence and civil unrest in Detroit, Newark, and more than 100 other cities across the country.

The volatile year saw 159 riots nationwide, and informed the country of black frustration and agitations for civil rights.

While New Brunswick was not immune from the unrest, no one was killed here and many view it as a key turning point in the city's history.

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ—New tenants are set to move into Naomi’s Way, formerly a "transitional shelter" for single women with children, located on Roosevelt Avenue in the city's Fourth Ward.

The Catholic Charities building has endured nearly four months of renovations, and now it will provide permanent housing for people in need.

The project grew beyond plans to simply update the kitchens in the 12-unit building after Piscataway-based American Standard reached out to get involved.

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ—A forum on the future of local media in New Jersey will be held on May 30 from 7-9 p.m. in room 323 at Rutgers University School of Communication and Information at 4 Huntington Street in New Brunswick.

The event is open to all members of the community and is presented by Free Press and Free Press Action Fund’s "News Voices: New Jersey" project.

NEWARK, NJ—The outspoken student leader of a Rutgers University organization advocating for undocumented immigrants remained free after a meeting with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) on May 9.

A crowd of over 100 gathered in front of the federal building on Broad Street in Newark to support and protest. Carimer Andujar received a summons last month for the interview with a federal deportation officer, spreading fear that she was targeted specifically for speaking out against the Trump administration.