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Lazos América Unida Celebrates Posada Navideña with December 20 Dance Show

Christmas Show to Feature Oaxacan Ballet Group at the Greater Brunswick Charter School
BFMNY

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ—Lazos América Unida, the downtown Oaxacan-Mexican cultural and youth center, will host its holiday season Posada Navideña show on Friday December 20 at 8pm.

Las Posadas, literally translating to "Christmas shelter" or "holiday inn," is a Spanish holiday, celebrated all over the world, particularly in Mexico and the US.

Posada Navideña is nativity scene demonstrating the Christian tale of Joseph and Mary’s search for shelter for the birth of Jesus. The Brooklyn-based traditional dance group Ballet Folkorico Mexicano de New York (BFMNY) will perform the scene at the Greater New Brunswick Charter School (429 Joyce Kilmer Avenue).

The Oaxacan award winning BFMNY is touring in honor of their 30th anniversary this year, and this will be their second trip to New Brunswick since this past July, having previously danced at the Lazos sponsored event La Gualaguetza in Boyd Park as part of New Brunswick Cultural Center's summer series Hub City Sounds.

Tickets are just $10 and include the price of admission, food, and drink. To purchase tickets or for more information, call (732) 745-8666 or email lazosau@gmail.com. Proceeds go to Lazos and BFMNY, the two non profits who make events like this possible.

Located on the first floor of 75 Paterson Street, Lazos América Unida serves as a youth and cultural center for residents of New Brunswick.  Offering educational events that explore and promote language, art, music and holidays, Lazos is an increasingly popular and active community-involvement project in the city.

Teresa Vivar, Executive Director of Lazos América Unida, says she started the organization in 2003 as a place to “unite efforts to work for a better community for everybody” and to celebrate Oaxacan themes of community, sharing, and education.

Oaxaca is located in the southwest region of Mexico, with its coast on the Pacific Ocean, and its own language and culture.  It is also the homeland of most of the city's Mexican immigrants.