Annual Summer Film Festival Kicks Off at Rutgers

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ—On Thursday, May 29, Rutgers annual summer film festival began with a screening of Steven Speilberg's "Jaws" in Scott Hall.

A joint venture between the Rutgers Film Co-op/New Jersey Media Arts Center brings film festivals to campus each spring, summer and fall, featuring dozens of films,  as well as lectures, workshops and panels on cinematic and the film industry.

Screenings will run Friday, Saturday and Sunday through July 10, in either Voorhees Hall or Scott Hall on College Avenue.  A full schedule is available on the NJFilmFest.com website.

On Saturday, June 7th, the festival will screen two films by writer and producer Sean McCarthy. Having directed, written, edited, produced and acted in dozens of films, two of his pieces will be screened.

The first movie, an animated film titled 'The Innovater," details the story of a young boy who visits  "No Creativity Park" a place where dreams and imagination are said to die. 

McCarthy's other piece, a more surreal, light-hearted and colorful film known as Moving Out will screen afterwards.

Moving Out depicts a young woman as she "moves out" from her old life. The unnamed protagonist opens her briefcase of memories, sifting through photos of failed friendships and romance, and subsequently destroying those photos. 

The young woman adventures through her own memories and imagination as the film grows more out of touch with reality. 

Ultimately, the film reaches its apex when the protagonist reaches a solution to the issues of her past. 

Then, on June 14th, Brad Mays's I Grew Up in Princeton will be screening at Voorhees Hall. 

This film, which takes on a more documentary-style approach, depicts with interviews high school and college students who lived in Princeton during the 1960's and 1970's.

The film festival will end with a screening of The Hunger Games: Catching Fire on Thursday, July 10th in Scott Hall. 

The screenings are open tot he general public and tickets are either free , or $8-$10, depending on the film.