Japanese Mayor to Visit New Brunswick and Speak at Hyatt Next Week

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ—The mayor of Fukui, Japan, one of New Brunswick's four "sister cities," is going to visit New Brunswick from October 8-11, according to New Brunswick international programs director Michael Tublin.

Mayor Higashimura will speak at the Hyatt Regency about Fukui and the jobs available in that city.

Fukui is on the west coast of Honshu, the largest island in Japan, and it is the capital of Fukui Prefecture. It is an old town, having been inhabited for at least a thousand years.

The summers in Fukui are hot and humid; the winters are cool but not particularly harsh. Fukui has several historic monuments (including two castles) and Japan's only harp manufacturer, Aoyama Harp

Fukui was practically demolished by American bombers in WWII, and was also heavily damaged a few years later by a 1948 earthquake. Because of its resurrection from the ruins, Fukui adopted the phoenix as its symbol.

"Municipalized in 1889, Fukui city has lived through war and earthquake damages as well as many other calamities," reads the city's website.

New Brunswick's other "sister cities" include another Japanese city, Tsurouka, as well as Debrecen, Hungary, and Limerick, Ireland.

 

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