NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ—State law requires at least 60 days notice to hold an election.  So for January 22's election to have been properly noticed, the board of education would have had to be give notice to the City Clerk and Middlesex County Board of Elections by November 23.

The only problem?  That would be impossible because no one knew if New Brunswick's board of education would be elected or appointed until the results of a November 6 referendum were certified on November 29.

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NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ—Tonight at 5pm, Elijah’s Promise will host an hour-long open house for anyone interested in receiving more information on their Promise Culinary School.

Elijah’s Promise, the city's only soup kitchen was founded in 1989.  Their Promise Culinary School was opened in 1997.

According to their website, they have taught "hundreds of students, preparing and placing them at jobs in the food service industry."

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NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ—Board of Education President Ed Spencer used every trick in the book to prevent NewBrunswickToday.com from asking a simple question of the city's new elected board members, as they faced the public for the first time.

"That will not happen… We do not do that.  We do not do that.  I will not allow it," said Spencer, a mayor-appointed board member who makes $58,828 annually as director of the city's teen center.

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NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ—The City Council was surprised to learn that a suspended police officer is back on the force, after previously being indicted for illegally voting in New Brunswick elections while he lived in other towns

After the council was asked by NewBrunswickToday.com whether rumors were true that former Lt. Robert Tierney had returned to active duty, the city's Business Administrator jumped in.

"He is [back on the force]," Thomas Loughlin told the Council.

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NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ—Tom Kelso and George Hendricks are two of the most powerful attorneys in New Brunswick's political machinery, and they're usually on the same side when it comes to elections.

Hendricks is a former City Councilman who opposed electing New Brunswick's school board, a change voters made in November. He earns $113,400 salary as the board's attorney, but also operates a private practice in the city.

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NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ—Even as the city's school board added its first-ever elected members Tuesday night, serious questions remained regarding the legality of the very election that sent them into public office.

Political newcomers Ronald Hush and Diana Fajardo surprised everyone, but especially their opponents, when their petitions to run for school board were submitted on Christmas Eve, three days after the advertised deadline.

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