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Historic Joyce Kilmer House Open for Tours on December 6

Farmhouse Was Once on Codwise Avenue, Later Renamed For Its Most Famous Resident
Joyce Kilmer House
At 17 Joyce Kilmer Avenue, this small farmhouse has been a historical landmark since 1969. Charlie Kratovil

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ—Saturday, December 6 brings the once in a year opportunity to the home of one of New Brunswick's most famous writers and residents, Joyce Kilmer.

The house, located at 17 Joyce Kilmer Avenue, at the corner with Welton Street, will be open from 10 AM to 4 PM for touring in observance of his 126th birthday.

Hosted by the New Brunswick Historical Association, admission and tours will be free.

Joyce Kilmer was born in the New Brunswick farmhouse on December 6, 1886 and was killed in World War I in France at the age of 31.

Joyce, whose given name is Alfred Joyce Kilmer, is well-known for his service in World War I and his poetic contributions.

The second level of the house includes memorabilia and writings of Kilmer, as well as artifacts from his life.

Some of his famous works include “Trees,” “Citizens of the world,” and “Madness.”

Kilmer wrote in a conservative style that stays with traditional poetic form and meter.

Many roads in New Jersey, including the one Kilmer grew up, today bare his name.  Originally Codwise Avenue, the road was later renamed for Kilmer.

The Kilmer name has also found its way onto an elementary school in Trenton, a postal service sorting facility in Edison, a US army base and college campus in Piscataway, and city parks in New Brunswick and the Bronx, NY, over the years.

The State of New Jersey declared the Joyce Kilmer house a historical site in 1969, and the bottom floor was given to the city of New Brunswick in 1994 for municipal office use.

It currently serves as the headquarters of the city's Dial-a-Ride program, which provides free rides for senior citizens to get to medical appointments.