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Supportive Housing Project For Domestic Violence Survivors Awarded $3 Million in Public Funds

Work on Dina's Dwellings to Begin This Fall, Will Transform Historic First Reformed Church
Town Clock CDC

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ—With the help of two recent donations from government entities, a new supportive housing location for victims of domestic violence will be able to begin construction in early September.

Organized by the Town Clock Community Development Corporation (CDC), "Dina’s Dwellings" will have ten units of permanent, supportive, and affordable housing solely for the use of domestic abuse survivors, located within the First Reformed Church in downtown.

On July 10, Housing and Mortgage Finance Agency approved $2.4 million in funding for the project.

The City of New Brunswick had allocated $604,385 in federal HOME funds to the project on June 18.

“HOME Investment Partnership Program Funds are annually allocated by HUD and are intended to fund projects that create and expand affordable housing," stated a recent city press release.

That donation was voted on and approved by the New Brunswick City Council.

New Brunswick Mayor Jim Cahill said, “The City of New Brunswick is proud to support Dina’s Dwellings and will continue to make supportive, affordable shelter available to as many residents as possible.”

With both large gifts approved, plus funding from Bergan County United Way, the NJ Historic Trust, Johnson & Johnson, and others, the project is almost fully funded.

The CDC has also received around $50,000 in private donations.

Reverend Susan Kramer-Mills, the executive director of Town Clock CDC, said, “It was a long hard road with many unexpected hurdles, but through that process we found many community partners and supports which encouraged us to continue.”

These funds will go to structurally remodeling the building to create ten apartments and a common worship and community space. Future funds will also go to creating supportive programs and helping survivors transition into their new environment.

Tenants will pay one-fourth of their rent, and the rest will be subsidized by Housing and Urban Development vouchers.

A public groundbreaking event will be held in early September.